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Injury Evidence Bank

Providing a summary of injury prevention evidence together in one location, the Evidence Bank aims to increase the awareness of reliable, accurate and authoritative research pieces.

If you would like a piece of evidence added to the Bank, please click here.

When searching the evidence bank the following search filters are available:

Primary target audience: The segmented group which the intervention or focus of the evidence is aiming to have the greatest influence on.

Stage of injury prevention: The three different stages in which interventions can take place; primary (aims to prevent an injury from occurring in the first place), secondary (early detection and prompt intervention) and tertiary (lessening the impact of an injury which has occurred and preventing a recurrence).

Setting: The place or environment in which the intervention was conducted or targeting.

In the future the Know Injury Evidence Bank will expand to include;

  • Drowning
  • Poisoning
  • Intentional self-harm
  • Violence
Note: Developed in collaboration with the WA Road Safety Education Committee. Following the success of the Road Trauma Evidence Bank, the resource has been expanded to additional injury topics.

Results

Viewing 1-10 of 26 results

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Year Injury Topic Stage of Injury Prevention Primary Target Audience Setting Reference

2009

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Health Professionals, Young People (15 - 25 years)

Transport Safety

Alcohol-related road fatalities can be reduced through alcohol policy measures such as increase in alcohol price, minimum purchase age laws and reduction in outlet density, with the support of mass media campaigns. This research indicates that an increase in alcohol price is associated with a reduction in alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.   Reference: Anderson P, Chisholm D, Fuhr DC. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of policies and programmes to reduce the harm caused by alcohol. The Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2234–46. Access from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19560605

2009

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Health Professionals, Young People (15 - 25 years)

Home Safety, School Safety

Findings from this systematic review suggest that media exposure and alcohol advertising influences when adolescents start to consume alcohol and increases alcohol consumption among baseline drinkers.   Reference: Anderson P, de Bruijn A, Angus K, Gordon R, Hastings G. Impact of Alcohol Advertising and Media Exposure on Adolescent Alcohol Use: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies. Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 May 1;44(3):229–43. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19144976

2010

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Transport Safety

This study suggests that lowering the legal BAC limit is effective in decreasing road traffic injuries and fatalities. After the implementation of RBT and the 0.05 BAC law, fatal collisions was reduced by 18% in Queensland and 8% in NSW. The results indicate that administrative licence suspension, zero tolerance laws and graduated licensing could help in decreasing alcohol-related injuries and deaths.   Reference: Killoran A, Canning U, Doyle N, Sheppard L. Review of effectiveness of laws limiting blood alcohol concentration levels to reduce alcohol-related road injuries and deaths. Final report. Centre for Public Health Excellence NICE; 2010. Available from; www.ias.org.uk/uploads/pdf/bloodalcoholcontenteffectivenessreview.pdf

2011

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Home Safety, Transport Safety

Alcohol-related harms are prevalent in drinking environments including nightclubs, bars and their surroundings. This article supports that responsible beverage service training, community mobilisation and enforcement of alcohol policies and legislation can help to reduce the incidence of injuries, crashes and violence.     Reference: Jones L, Hughes K, Atkinson AM, Bellis MA. Reducing harm in drinking environments: A systematic review of effective approaches. Health & Place. 2011 Mar 1;17(2):508–18. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21257334

2011

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Health Professionals, Young People (15 - 25 years)

Home Safety, School Safety, Sport and Recreation Safety

A cross-sectional behavioural survey of young people regarding a binge drinking campaign found that 74.7% of 1,072 participants recognised the campaign message. The authors suggest that strategies that are more population-relevant and targeted should be developed in health promotion campaigns to reach the target group.   Reference: van Gemert C, Dietze P, Gold J, Sacks-Davis R, Stoové M, Vally H, et al. The Australian national binge drinking campaign: campaign recognition among young people at a music festival who report risky drinking. BMC Public Health. 2011 Jun 20;11:482. Available from; https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-11-482

2011

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Middle Years (9 - 14 years), Older Adults (65 years and over), Young People (15 - 25 years)

Home Safety

The results of this study indicate that restricting pub closing times could result in a reduction in alcohol-related violence. Restricting pub closing times to 3/3:30am in New South Wales reduced assault incidences by 37% in comparison to a control location.   Reference: Kypri K, Jones C, McElduff P, Barker D. Effects of restricting pub closing times on night-time assaults in an Australian city. Addiction. 2011 Feb 1;106(2):303–10. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20840191

2012

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Young People (15 - 25 years)

Home Safety, School Safety

This study concludes that there is an association between parental supply of alcohol for unsupervised drinking and risky drinking among adolescents aged between 13 and 17 years. Given this finding the authors suggest that parents and families may be a target for interventions aimed at reducing risky drinking among adolescents.   Reference: Gilligan C, Kypri K, Johnson N, Lynagh M, Love S. Parental supply of alcohol and adolescent risky drinking. Drug and Alcohol Review. 2012 Sep 1;31(6):754–62. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22340514

2013

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Home Safety, Transport Safety

This research shows that a 10% increase in the affordability of beer could lead to a 16% decrease in consumption. The authors suggest that given these findings policy makers need to consider affordability in the determination of tax and pricing policies to lower the rate of alcohol-related harm.     Reference: Wall M, Casswell S. Affordability of alcohol as a key driver of alcohol demand in New Zealand: a co-integration analysis. Addiction. 2013 Jan 1;108(1):72–9. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22724896

2013

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Transport Safety

Reviewing alcohol advertising codes in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom, this review provides evidence that alcohol advertising influences drinking behaviours, and that Australia's voluntary regulation system is not effective. Further evidence regarding volume restrictions, content restrictions and infrastructure which supports the regulatory environment are highlighted.   Reference: Jones SC, Gordon R. Regulation of alcohol advertising: Policy options for Australia. Evidence Base. 2013;2013(2):1–37. Available from; https://researchers.mq.edu.au/en/publications/regulation-of-alcohol-advertising-policy-options-for-australia  

2014

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Home Safety, Transport Safety

The results indicate that alcohol consumption and it's associated harms could be reduced by increasing the price and controlling the availability of alcohol. Improvements to the inconsistencies in the level of control on price and taxation in Australian could be improved through policy developments.   Reference: Howard SJ, Gordon R, Jones SC. Australian alcohol policy 2001–2013 and implications for public health. BMC Public Health. 2014 Aug 15;14:848. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25127552
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