Content

Injury Evidence Bank

Providing a summary of injury prevention evidence together in one location, the Evidence Bank aims to increase the awareness of reliable, accurate and authoritative research pieces.

If you would like a piece of evidence added to the Bank, please click here.

When searching the evidence bank the following search filters are available:

Primary target audience: The segmented group which the intervention or focus of the evidence is aiming to have the greatest influence on.

Stage of injury prevention: The three different stages in which interventions can take place; primary (aims to prevent an injury from occurring in the first place), secondary (early detection and prompt intervention) and tertiary (lessening the impact of an injury which has occurred and preventing a recurrence).

Setting: The place or environment in which the intervention was conducted or targeting.

In the future the Know Injury Evidence Bank will expand to include;

  • Drowning
  • Poisoning
  • Intentional self-harm
  • Violence
Note: Developed in collaboration with the WA Road Safety Education Committee. Following the success of the Road Trauma Evidence Bank, the resource has been expanded to additional injury topics.

Results

Viewing 6-15 of 47 results

Sort By:

Year Injury Topic Stage of Injury Prevention Primary Target Audience Setting Reference

2020

Alcohol-related harm, Drowning, Falls, Intentional self-harm, Poisoning

Primary, Secondary

Whole Community

Home Safety, Sport and Recreation Safety, Water Safety

Health, A. G. D. of. National Injury Prevention Strategy 2020–2030. Australian Government Department of Health https://www.health.gov.au/initiatives-and-programs/national-injury-prevention-strategy-2020-2030-0 (2020). Access from:
https://www.health.gov.au/initiatives-and-programs/national-injury-prevention-strategy-2020-2030-0

2019

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Home Safety

Department of Health. National Alcohol Strategy 2019–2026. 44 (2019). Available from: www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/national-alcohol-strategy-2019-2028

2019

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Claydon C, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. National Drug Strategy Household Survey detailed report 2019. Canberra, ACT: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; 2019. Available from: https://www.aihw.gov.au/about-our-data/our-data-collections/national-drug-strategy-household-survey/2019-ndshs

2018

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Young People (15 - 25 years)

School Safety

This study utilised Australian student survey data to analyse trends in substance use and other associated influential factors. The findings indicate that substance use has decreased significantly from 1999 to 2015 and that these reductions may be associated with reductions in parents favourable attitudes towards substance use.   Reference: Toumbourou JW, Rowland B, Ghayour-Minaie M, Sherker S, Patton GC, Williams JW. Student survey trends in reported alcohol use and influencing factors in Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev [Internet]. 2018 Jan 12 [cited 2018 Jan 18]; Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dar.12645/abstract

2018

Alcohol-related harm

Primary, Secondary

Health Professionals, Whole Community

Mental Health Commission. Western Australian Alcohol and Drug Interagency Strategy 2018-2022. (2018). Available fromwww.mhc.wa.gov.au/about-us/strategic-direction/western-australian-alcohol-and-drug-interagency-strategy-2018-2022/

2018

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Whole Community

Home Safety

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Impact of alcohol and illicit drug use on the burden of disease and injury in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011. (2018). Available from: www.aihw.gov.au/reports/burden-of-disease/impact-alcohol-illicit-drug-use-on-burden-disease/contents/table-of-contents

2018

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Young People (15 - 25 years)

Water Safety

This study found that Western Australian school leavers have a relatively high awareness of the "Don't Drink and Drown" campaign and knowledge of the risks associated with alcohol consumption and swimming. Reference: Enkel, S., Nimmo, L., Jancey, J. & Leavy, J. Alcohol and injury risk at a Western Australian school leavers festival. Health promotion journal of Australia ePub, ePub (2018). Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29577479/

2018

Alcohol-related harm, Road Trauma

Primary

Whole Community

Transport Safety

This study found that road traffic crashes with more on-premise outlets nearby were more likely to be alcohol-related, however there inconsistent results regarding the proximity of bottleshops and the type of road traffic crash. Reference: Hobday, M. & Meuleners, L. Alcohol and non-alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes in Perth, Australia: do alcohol outlets make a difference? Accident analysis and prevention 113, 117–124 (2018). Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0001457518300137

2017

Alcohol-related harm

Secondary

Middle Years (9 - 14 years), Older Adults (65 years and over), Young People (15 - 25 years)

Transport Safety

This study found that the general population and some respondents categorised as high risk drinkers perceived alcohol interlocks to be personally useful. Compared to females, males were more likely to respond that alcohol interlocks are personally useful.   Reference: Bishop CA, Liu S, Stephens AN, Fitzharris M. Associations between alcohol consumption patterns and attitudes towards alcohol interlocks. Accident Analysis & Prevention. 2017 Nov 1;108:83–90. Available from; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28858776

2017

Alcohol-related harm

Primary

Health Professionals, Whole Community

Home Safety, School Safety, Transport Safety

This evidence review found that an increase in alcohol price is associated with a decrease in the rate of consumption and that young people in particular are more sensitive to changes in alcohol price. Changes to alcohol trading hours and mass media campaigns were also found to influence consumption levels. The article concludes that a combination of alcohol pricing policies would create a greater impact on drinking patterns and alcohol-related harms. Reference: Burton R, Henn C, Lavoie D, O’Connor R, Perkins C, Sweeney K, et al. A rapid evidence review of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of alcohol control policies: an English perspective. The Lancet. 2017 Apr 15;389(10078):1558–80. Available from; http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)32420-5/abstract